When it comes to changing my newborn son, I am at two disadvantages: one, this is my first child so I am a new mom, and two, I come from a family of predominately girls. This means I had no clue how to even change a boys diaper until taking an infant prep class when I was 8 months pregnant.

While it’s not rocket science (although I am glad I learned how to properly clean and care for his privates), nothing could prepare me for the wet mess a 2-week-old can make.

Now just about 3 weeks in, I have yet to master preventing my son from peeing through his clothes.

Here’s the situation: every so often (once or twice a day), when I go to hold, change or feed the baby, my hand discovers a wet spot through his clothes in the back and to one side. This pee spot actually is a bit higher than the start of his diaper which makes me wonder how it even gets drenched there.

I do make sure to change him often because he doesn’t cry when wet so peeing through his pants is no problem for him. My husband and I have tried to aim his private downwards during a diaper change so that it is not up and leaning to a side where the accident will happen. We even exchanged all the Huggies for Pampers Swaddlers, which fit him better and reduced the amount of pee blowouts, yet it still occurs. (I am dreading the inevitable poop blowout that I will face one day.)

As much as I love putting my son in adorable outfits, changing his clothes multiple times a day when you are exhausted is precious time taken away from that one thing you enjoyed most in life, sleep.

So after doing some of my own research, here’s the best ways to prevent this from happening.

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via GIPHY

1. The Right Size

The most important thing is to make sure your baby is wearing the appropriate size diaper based on their weight. You don’t want to put the diaper on too tight, but make sure its tight enough on the waist to prevent his penis from wiggling around everywhere.

Many women say going a size bigger helps tremulously. Although they might not outgrow a particular size, the absorbancy might not be up to par on the smaller size so try a bigger size and fold the top and secure it tightly to better fit.

Once your baby is about to outgrow a diaper size, that’s when leaks start to happen, I read. Make sure to at least use a size up for bedtime.

Just keep in mind, this might not work in all cases—especially when the baby isn’t ready for a bigger size, which means an even bigger mess will happen if the diaper is more loose.

2. The Right Brand

Like I did, try switching brands to find the best fit. Many mommys on discussion boards say that changing brands is a life changer. There are many who say Huggies are the best for them, others prefer Luvs or Pampers or even Target brand. Find the one that’s best for your baby when it comes to the size and fit.

3. Cloth Diapers

Many parents also recommend using cloth diapers to avoid this problem. Somehow they don’t have this problem when ditching disposable for cloth. Then again, many might not want to deal with the cleanup on this option.

4. Change Often

This might be obvious, but change your baby’s diaper often so it’s not soaked with urine. Make sure to also change before the baby goes to sleep and before you go to sleep.

5. Overnight Diapers

Brands like Huggies and Pampers sell overnight diapers that are more absorbent for preventing overnight leaks. They are a bit more expensive, but could be worth every penny if it means you aren’t changing clothes and crib sheets in the middle of the night. Plus these are only used at nighttime so a box should last longer than day time diapers.

Have you faced this problem? Let me know how you prevent leaky diapers.

Photo: Personal Creations | Flickr

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