Are apologies needed when to it comes to your fitness goals?

First of all, I want to apologize to my blog followers since I have fallen off the face of the virtual planet last week. Last week I got to spend lots of time with my boyfriend and his family, plus was balancing work. That was all the writing I wanted to do for a few days. I am so blessed to have an amazing job doing what I love, but sometimes writing after you have been writing all day is the last thing I feel like doing.

But I did miss you all and promise to catch up on all my email and blog post from as much of you as I can!

I know that you bloggers will forgive the absence, but do you ever find it hard to forgive yourself after missing a workout?

Last week was a HORRIBLE running week for me. I skipped out on my long run, but did lots of walking two days in a row that left my legs, knees, and muscles aching. I decided to take a two-day break, but the rest days just kept on coming. Truth is, I just didn’t feel like running. I think my body needed the break, but my mind just wasn’t with it either.

After skipping a few scheduled runs, I went out for a 7-miler on Monday—nothing like a fresh week to get back on track. But I found the run challenging in the beginning and a bit slower than I would have liked. This had me panicking that all the training I have been doing was reversed. I started to doubt if I am ready for my next race. The guilt began to seep into thoughts.

The first 2 or 3 miles where surely a bit difficult, but after they were completed I felt like I could run forever. Even at 7-miles, I wanted to run more. I decided to stop only because I didn’t want to push myself too hard with my next half coming up on Sunday. The smell of barbeque was in the air. Leaves crunched beneath my feet. It was the perfect pre-fall run that left me feeling reborn.

After the refreshing run, my guilt subsided a bit, but I can’t help but feel like I should have let so many days pass without running. Should I feel guilty?

I know some people who pay for gym classes or personal trainers and cancel last minute just because they don’t feel like going. Would that make you feel guilty if you set certain fitness goals for yourself (not to mention spent the money)? I am all for taking breaks and skipping workouts when necessary (and sometimes just because), but I am very committed to my goals no matter how small or big. If I skip, I feel like I let myself down.

This got me thinking, how often should we forgive ourselves after we prevent ourselves from reaching our goals? Yes, have that dessert. Yes, decide to run an extra mile tomorrow instead of today. But how many days should pass before the guilt sinks in?

For me, it took only a few days. I enjoyed being a bum for a few days, focusing on other tasks, but even now I can’t help but think how a quick run would only take 20-30 minutes out of my day. Half the battle is just getting out there.

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Should you apologize to your trainer after working hard for 2 months and then stop slowing up? Should you apologize to your running buddy after you decide to watch the Keeping Up with the Kardashian marathon instead of joining them? Should you apologize to yourself for breaking a promise you made to yourself?

At the end of the day, it is YOUR goals. Only you can hold yourself accountable. So I am not begging myself for forgiveness because I wanted to take last week off, and I won’t be punishing myself for missing the runs. I won’t be restricting my diet or try to make up mileage. Instead, I am taking it one day and a time this week, preparing my body and mind for my race on Sunday.

Sure I could continue to feel guilty that it was a bad week, but in hindsight, 4 or 5 runs won’t make or break the training that I started back early in the summer.

I choose NOT to be guilty.

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