Red wine and chocolate won’t help an unhealthy heart. A new study has found that there is no proof that resveratrol, the antioxidant found in red wine and chocolate, prevents heart disease, cancer, or could prolong life.

The nine year study, led by Professor Richard Semba from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, included researchers studying 783 elder people in two small towns in Tusacny. Urine samples were taken from the participants to measure the amount of resveratrol in their system and their daily diets were logged.

The researchers found that resveratrol was not linked with inflammation in the blood, or risk of heart disease, cancer, or even death. 174 people still developed heart disease and 34 were diagnosed with cancer. 268 men and women died.

“In conclusion, this prospective study of nearly 800 older community-dwelling adults shows no association between urinary resveratrol metabolites and longevity,” the authors wrote in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

Semba stated that if there are any health benefits from drinking wine or eating chocolate, than it must be coming form another shared ingredient.

“The story of resveratrol turns out to be another case where you get a lot of hype about health benefits that doesn’t stand the test of time,” Semba told BBC News.

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