Living amidst the buildings that are as high as the heavens, as New Yorkers there is no denying that we are habitats of the concrete jungle.  Even if it seems like the lands of green pastures and roaming cows is far away, we  should not compromise what type of foods we choose to buy and eat.

Even if we live in the wild environment of the gritty city, purchasing food from local farmer’s markets and eating organically are options we have. Restaurants that promote a green lifestyles is a trend that has been sprouting out all over the boroughs. Brooklyn’s Cafe Habana for example, uses solar panels, has a garden and is more famously known for it’s bicycle blender eliminates the need for a motor. With organic restaurants like Bare Burger and Rose Water blooming in trendy neighborhoods, it might be safe to say that being apart of this green, organic lifestyle is trendy in itself.

But is organic food really good for us? This question was addressed after a Stanford University study reported that organically grown food did not prove to be more nutritious for us than conventionally grown food. The only difference the study found was that there was lower pesticides found in the all natural produce. But those who defend the organic way of eating and living, believe that the study misses the point. Pesticides are extremely harmful for our bodies and can we really trust who sets the safety limits concerning pesticides and antibiotics used in food when many are linked to corrupt corporations?

For those interested in this lifestyle, New Yorkers can get involved in good, clean and fair food. This is the slogan used by the slow food movement.  Slow Food uses the word good to stand for the enjoyment of food “created with care from healthy plants and animals.” Clean refers to the quality of the food, mainly nutritious food that should not only be healthy for our bodies, but also for the environment. Lastly, the organization believes that food should be available for all people, regardless of a person’s income.

The organizations New York chapter  hosts local events to spread awareness and educate New Yorkers about healthy food, while allowing  local farmers to sell their produce to help grow our food economy Board meetings are open to the public, which allows residents to educate themselves and stay on top of issues they are passionate about. This gives everyone the opportunity to participate in the organization and  have a voice in the cause.

It is important to know where the food we consume comes from and how harmful or hurtful it is for our bodies. But in the greater scheme of things, it is equally important to preserve our environment and protect not only animals, but encourage the local farmer who often gets overlooked by big corporations.

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