Animal activists stood together and took a stand against the slaughtering of dolphins in Japan at the NYC Japan Dolphin Day 2012 rally. Every year, around 20,000 dolphins are killed in an inhumane fashion that begins September 1st and ends in April. It is considered to be the largest slaughter in the world. Fishermen entice the mammals to what is known as the cove in Taiji by an acoustic wall of sound that is created when they bang on long poles they have placed into the water. After trapping the dolphins then hiding them in a secured and restricted cove the “pretty ones” are selected to be sent to aquariums for dolphin shows. Others face a doomed ending as they are killed in a process that includes cutting their throats with machetes or stabbing them with spears. The meat is than sold as a delicacy even though it is extremely toxic because of the high mercury levels.

Taffy Lee Williams, founder of NY 4 Whales spoke to Brooklyn College’s Sex and Politics radio show to educate listeners and spread awareness. “It’s a real educational, learning experience when you first get involved with whale issues.” she told the show.

Williams also hosted the NYC Japan Dolphin Day 2012 protest that included 36 protestors passing out flyers to New Yorkers passing by on foot and by car. Call and response chants were shouted outside the Japanese consult, the voices booming as high as the skyscrapers towering over the activist. “We are begging that they have mercy. There’s no need for this,” stated Williams.

 Another activist and  member of FAUN, Roberto Bonelli shouted into a megaphone that the tradition of the Japanese is out dated and that tradition doesn’t justify this cruelty.

Bonelli exclaimed, “All we want is for you, the Japanese government, to stop the hunt and leave these beautiful intelligent creatures alone. Learn to live in harmony with nature. This is an opportunity for you to show compassion and your civility to the rest of the world. This is an opportunity to be a leader, a world leader. I suggest you take it.”

 

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